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Organizations

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Organizations

These are links to organizations that provide students with membership, internships and scholarships. There is also rich, dynamic content on many of these sites as they address current issues of diversity and the media.

  • National Association of Black Journalists The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) is an organization of journalists, students and media-related professionals that provides quality programs and services to and advocates on behalf of black journalists worldwide. Founded by 44 men and women on December 12, 1975, in Washington, D.C., NABJ is the largest organization of journalists of color in the nation.
  • National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) is dedicated to the recognition and professional advancement of Hispanics in the news industry. Established in April 1984, NAHJ created a national voice and unified vision for all Hispanic journalists. NAHJ has approximately 2,300 members, including working journalists, journalism students, other media-related professionals and journalism educators.
  • Native American Journalists Association (NAJA) serves and empowers Native journalists through programs and actions designed to enrich journalism and promote Native cutlures. NAJA recognizes Native Americans as distinct peoples based on tradition and culture. NAJA educates and unifies its membership through journalism programs that promote diversity and defends challenges to free press, speech and expression.
  • Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) is a non-profit professional and educational organization with more than 2,000 members today. AAJA serves Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders by encouraging young people to consider journalism as a career, developing managers in the media industry, and promoting fair and accurate news coverage. AAJA uses the term "Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders" to embrace all Americans--both citizens and residents -- who self-identify with one or more of the three dozen nationalities and ethnic groups in East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, the Middle East and the Pacific Islands.
  • South Asian Journalists Association (SAJA) serves as a networking and resource forum for journalists of South Asian origin and journalists interested in South Asia or the South Asian Diaspora. Its mission includes acting as a resource to facilitate and promote thorough, accurate coverage of South Asia and the South Asian diaspora, including South Asians in North America. This includes coverage of media freedom and censorship issues affecting South Asian communities. As a journalism organization, SAJA staunchly believes in the First Amendment's promise of freedom of speech and also that a vital and free press is necessary to the well being of every nation.
  • UNITY: Journalists of Color is a strategic alliance advocating fair and accurate news coverage about people of color, and aggressively challenging the industry to staff its organizations at all levels to reflect the nation’s diversity. We envision a nation in which newsrooms are inclusive and reflect the communities they cover, and where people of color hold positions of influence. To achieve this we will conduct research, convene people and advocate change by offering attainable solutions to the industry. UNITY, representing more than 10,000 journalists of color, is comprised of four national associations: Asian American Journalists Association, National Association of Black Journalists, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, and the Native American Journalists Association.
  • National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association (NLGJA) is an organization of journalists, media professionals, educators and students working from within the news industry to foster fair and accurate coverage of LGBT issues. NLGJA opposes all forms of workplace bias and provides professional development to its members. NLGJA's National Board of Directors, chapter leadership, and members come from rural to major metropolitan print, broadcast, and online newsrooms, as well as community-based LGBT media, academic institutions, and the public relations and communications profession. Our strength and respect in the industry comes from the diversity of our membership.
  • Out in Television and Film is the national professional organization that promotes the visibility of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender professionals in the film and television industries; helps LGBT professionals achieve their highest professional goals; and fosters corporate cultures that provide equal opportunities and benefits for "out" professionals.
  • Muslim Journalists Association (MAJA) provides a forum for Muslim journalists to network and share ideas, experiences and advice. It is a resource and mouthpiece for Muslim American journalists as we struggle to develop our unique professional identities. MAJA is a nonpartisan organization that is open to individuals of any race or ethnic background with a strong interest in promoting fair and accurate coverage of Muslims in the media, and those involved in fields of communications, including journalism, freelance writing, television, radio, newspapers, newsletters, public relations, advertising, marketing, IT communications, public affairs, poetry, fiction writing and non-fiction writing.
  • Religious Newswriters Association (RNA) is a non-profit trade association founded in 1949 to advance the professional standards of religion reporting in the secular press as well as to create a support network for religion reporters. RNA strives to help improve and encourage religion writing excellence in the secular press. RNA prides itself on its network of experienced religion journalists in the print and broadcast media, as well as its member support through its educational annual conference and online tools for journalists. RNA is also a resource for speakers about religion reporting or for sources on religious topics.
  • National Center on Disability and Journalism (NCDJ) is an independent journalism organization. Our mission is to educate journalists and educators about disability reporting issues in order to produce more accurate, fair and diverse news reporting. The mission is realized through research, development and distribution of educational resources.
  • Oklahoma Institute for Diversity in Journalism (OIDJ) program offers an opportunity for promising high school students to participate in its annual workshop. Valued at about $2,000 per participant, the program is funded by several organizations including the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, the Oklahoman, the Tulsa World, and the Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication.OIDJ’s mission is to provide opportunities for students who would otherwise lack access to journalism training or who face other barriers to pursuing careers in journalism. This document explains the program and the 2009 application is available.