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Center for Autonomous Sensing and Sampling

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Welcome to CASS

Center for Autonomous Sensing and Sampling

What is CASS

The mission of the Center for Autonomous Sensing and Sampling is to explore, advance, and develop complete adaptive and autonomous sensing and sampling systems for use in the atmosphere, on the ground, and in the water and to help facilitate the integration of this technology across various disciplines and institutions. We achieve this by bringing together, faculty, staff, and students from a wide range of disciplines such as  electrical engineering, computer science, data science and analytics, chemistry, geography, civil engineering, aerospace and mechanical engineering, physics, and meteorology. Areas of research focus currently include atmospheric chemistry, boundary layer structure and dynamics, data processing and visualization, earth science, and solution-based engineering. 

News

April 29, 2020

Researchers awarded NASA grant to improve forecasting

CopterSonde aricraft

As a part of a collaborative team of researchers, the Center for Autonomous Sensing and Sampling and the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms at the University of Oklahoma received a NASA grant to develop improvements for low-altitude weather forecasting. This team is one of five university teams from across the nation selected to examine a range of technical areas in support of NASA’s aeronautics research goals.

The lead for OU’s contribution to the collaborative grant is Phillip B. Chilson, director of the Center for Autonomous Sensing and Sampling, faculty member in Advanced Radar Research Center and professor in the School of Meteorology.

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March 6, 2020

CASS Research Assistant Selected to Participate in Prestigious Summer School Program

Brian Greene

Brian Greene, a Ph.D. student in the School of Meteorology and a research assistant with CASS, was recently selected to participate in the “Field Experiment on Submesoscale Spatio-Temporal Variability in Lindenberg” (FESSTVaL) summer school program. Although postponed in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, this program will ultimately take place for two weeks in Lindenberg, Germany (a short train ride outside of Berlin), and is led by a diverse panel of international experts on topics such as convective scale observations from different platforms and sub-mesoscale dynamics and modeling.

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