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American Association of Geographers (AAG) Annual Meeting 2022

February 25-March 1   |   New York City, NY (held virtually)

AAG Annual Meeting info

AAG Program PDF

 

The College of A&GS participants are in bold; presenters and session chairs are underlined

Friday, February 25th

Jevons’ Paradox, Center Pivot Irrigation (CPI) and Hydro-Social Resilience in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) (Talk)

Jacqueline VadjunecOklahoma State University, Todd Fagin, Center for Spatial Analysis/Oklahoma Biological Survey, University of Oklahoma, Adam Straub, Oklahoma State University, Belem Carrasco, Oklahoma State University, Austin Boardman, Oklahoma State University

Date/Time: 2/25/2022/9:00 am

Session: Agricultural Landscape Transitions 1 (8:00-9:20 am)

Keywords: Jevons' Paradox, Irrigation, Agroecological Resilience, Southern Great Plains 

Abstract

Much of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) experiences cyclical drought which drives land-use and land-cover changes (LULCC), including aquifer depletion, further impacting land management. The compounding effects of cyclical drought, along with the growing dependence on irrigation, threaten agroecological resilience, rural communities, and traditional ways of life in the region. Here, we argue that Land System Science (LSS) and geohydrological studies benefit from a closer engagement with the hydro-social components of aquifer drawdown. Using Jevons’ Paradox and the case of center pivot irrigation (CPI) growth in the SGP, we argue that CPI creates an illusion of water sustainability and socioecological resilience, while at the same time increasing the demand for agricultural water consumption which only furthers the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer. To explore the importance of incorporating hydro-social experiences, we draw on 10 years of participatory, ethnographic fieldwork, to complement remote sensing analysis, historical agricultural and USDA subsidy data. Results show that although CPI is supposed to make land managers less vulnerable to drought, the standard “technology package” (including subsidies) for the region exhibits a Jevons' Paradox. Instead, residents express concerns related to current and future CPI use and subsequent groundwater drawdown, as well as the vulnerability that comes with increasing reliance on irrigation, especially given the way that drought exacerbates irrigation issues.

Enhancing meteorological mobile radar observations through deployment location optimization (Talk)

Xin (Selena) FengDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma, David Schvartzman, Advanced Radar Research Center, University of Oklahoma

Date/Time: 2/25/2022/11:20 am

Session: Conditions of Meteorological Hazards (11:20 am-12:40 pm)

Keywords: meteorological mobile radar, GIS, spatial optimization

Abstract

Weather-related injuries have increased by 9% over the last five years, with an 8% increase in the number of weather events. In 2020, a total of 60,714 weather events in the United States lead to 585 deaths and 1,708 injuries according to the data of the National Safety Council. Accurate high-resolution radar observations are critical to improving the prediction and warning of severe weather events and supporting the mission of saving lives and property. In recent years, mobile radars have been shown to provide key observations (e.g., with high spatial and temporal resolution) to improve conceptual modeling of mesoscale severe weather events. Modern dual-polarization radars provide polarimetric measurements that enable quantitative precipitation estimation and hydrometeor classification, used to determine types of scatterers (e.g., rain, hail, snow) in the radar coverage region. The deployment of mobile radar trucks, therefore, becomes an essential research topic to improve the understanding and prediction of severe weather phenomena. However, mobile radar trucks are limited in number and expensive to build. Further, their performance is impacted by local environmental contexts, such as terrain, distance to ground clutter targets (trees, buildings, wind turbines), radar spacing, etc. Both benefits and limitations can be taken into account, bringing to bear on decision making and potential policy associated with mobile radar deployment. This article develops a methodology for locating model radar trucks based on utilizing spatial analytics, including GIS and spatial optimization. Findings and results highlight the potential utility and benefits through the systematic analysis of mobile radar siting.

Wolves in the News: Reintroduction, Ecosystems, Management, Hunting, Politics, Protection (Talk)

Randy A. PepplerDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma

Date/Time: 2/25/2022/2:30 pm

Session: Animals and Conservation Efforts (2:00-3:20 pm)

Keywords: wolves, wolf news coverage, wolf discourses 

Abstract

Since wolf reintroduction in Yellowstone National Park in 1995, wolves have entered the collective consciousness of the public regarding their place in the modern world. With the success of that introduction, management of wolves as they roam beyond protected areas has become an important issue in many places in the U.S. In the past ten years, the number of news stories about wolves has increased as wolf-human interactions increase. In this in-person paper presentation, I will review what has been reported in the media about gray and Mexican wolves since 2010 as an environment-society relation, and point out some of the emerging discourses constructed about them, via a systematic look through media databases. Some questions that arise include, “Should we rewild?”; “Do wolves really contribute to a healthier ecosystem?”; “What level of hunting should be allowed as part of wolf management, and where?”; “Who gets to decide the fate of wolves?”; “Is it a good idea to let the voters decide about wolves?”; “Should wolves still be considered endangered?”.

Participatory Mapping with sUAS: An Example from the Southern Great Plains (Poster)

Todd D. FaginCenter for Spatial Analysis/Oklahoma Biological Survey, University of Oklahoma, Jacqueline M. Vadjunec, Oklahoma State University, Austin Boardman, Oklahoma State University

Date/Time: 2/25/2022/5:20-6:40 pm

Session: Topics in Remote Sensing (5:20-6:40 pm)

Keywords: sUAS, participatory mapping, citizen science, Southern Great Plains

Abstract

Attempts to link the social sciences with remote Earth observations date back to at least the mid-1990s when the National Resource Council (NRC), at the behest of NASA, organized a workshop to bring social and remote sensing scientists together. From this workshop, a seminal volume, Pixel and People: Linking Remote Sensing and Social Science (NRC 1998) was produced. The overarching goals of these early endeavors were to get social scientists to use remotely sensed data and to foster collaboration between remote sensing experts and social scientists. However, despite attempts to “socialize the pixel” and “pixelize the social,” the analysis and interpretation of remotely sensed data, even within a social context, has remained largely a top-down approach with limited input from affected stakeholders. Indeed, so-called participatory sensing has primarily involved ground-level observations to verify (i.e. ground truth) remote sensing data products and/or participatory mapping methods to compliment remotely sensed data products. The acquisition and processing of remote sensing products, though, have largely remained non-participatory. However, the recent surge in relatively low-cost, ready-to-fly small unoccupied aerial systems (sUAS), colloquially known as drones, may be changing this. In this study, we present some preliminary observations from a multi-year participatory research/citizen science study known as ARID (Agroecosystems Resilience in Times of Drought) in which we worked with farmers and ranchers in three drought-stricken counties in the Southern Great Plains to collect and process low-altitude aerial images from sUAS of participants’ lands in an attempt to foster resiliency in times of climate uncertainty.

Saturday, February 26th

Exploring health equity and environmental justice in U.S. cities' climate change adaptation plans (Talk)

Lauren E. MullenbachDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma, Sonja A. Wilhelm Stanis, University of Missouri

Date/Time: 2/26/2022/10:25 am

Session: Climate gentrification: Emerging themes and methods (9:40-11:00 am)

Keywords: climate justice, health equity, gentrification, U.S. cities

Abstract

Cities respond to the threat of climate change by creating climate adaptation plans. Some cities adapt to climate change and address human health concerns simultaneously by building parks and green spaces. However, low-income and minority residents have less access to quality green space and are more vulnerable to climate change impacts. Thus, as more cities incorporate parks and green space into their climate adaptation plans, the risk of potential injustices—such as climate gentrification—rises. The purpose of this study was to understand the extent to which U.S. cities’ climate change adaptation plans discuss health equity/justice, including injustices related to green spaces. We conducted summative content analysis on 88 cities’ climate adaptation plans, which uses keyword searches to document the frequency, context, and ways keywords are used. We also conducted a sub-analysis on shrinking cities, given their unique opportunity to “re-grow” more equitably, but also their opportunity for gentrification and to exploit vulnerable populations. Most cities mentioned either equity/justice (81%) or health (97%) in their plans. However, only half mentioned health and equity/justice concurrently. Few cities discussed parks/green space in a health equity/justice context (28%). Shrinking cities disproportionately discussed health equity/justice, compared to non-shrinking cities. Newer plans were more attentive to health equity/justice than older plans. This temporal trend held when looking at parks/green space. Cities were more likely to speak generally about problems and solutions than offer specifics. Cities may need to detail specific solutions to these complex health equity/justice consequences from climate change or risk perpetuating injustices.

Navigating heterogenous sanitation configurations: how off-grid technologies are worked and reworked by users (Talk)

Gloria Nsangi NakyagabaDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma, Mary Lawhon, University of Edinburgh, Shuaib Lwasa, Center for Adaptation

Date/Time: 2/26/2022/2:15 pm

Session: Intersections in Technology and Geography (2:00-3:20 pm)

Keywords: off-grid, heterogeneous, configurations

Abstract

A range of innovative off-grid technologies have been developed and deployed to improve sanitation in developing cities. While advances have been made to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal of sanitation for all, challenges remain. For example, at times, gaps between designs and deployed technologies and the needs or wants of users. In this context, urban residents reconfigure technologies to meet their diverse sanitation preferences. In this study, we explore off-grid technologies as heterogeneous infrastructure configuration of people, toilets, roles, responsibilities, costs and benefits. We investigate reasons for the use of technologies and how they have been adapted for two sites in Kampala through interviews and Focus Group Discussions. In the first site, struggles with costs and maintenance, flush handles were replaced with manual pouring. Participants reported attunement and willingness to work with the reconfigured infrastructure. In the second site, a bio-fill toilet with separate chambers for ‘long and short calls’ was placed at in the market. Not long after, only one was working and a much lower than anticipated use. Here, availability of other good, workable and proximate options influenced users against the bio-fill. In sum, we use these cases to think through heterogeneous infrastructure configurations, including the ways that technologies can be reconfigured and the ways connection to other spaces and infrastructure shapes use. We hope to further ongoing inquiries into the use, expansion, improvement and regulation of heterogeneity for urban sanitation.

Sunday, February 27th

Where there’s a (oil) well, there’s a way: How energy sector involvement and political ideology impacts support in climate change policy (Talk)

Claire BurchDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma, Justin Reedy, Department of Communication, University of Oklahoma

Date/Time: 2/27/2022/11:20 am

Session: Unconventional Oil and Gas Development: Geographies of Health and Well-being across Impacted Landscapes (11:20 am-12:40 pm)

Keywords: renewable energy, climate change, policy, Oklahoma, employment

Abstract

As concerns related to climate change continue to increase, governments at all levels are beginning to explore various policy options for decreasing emissions, increasing renewable energy (RE) usage, and overall working to mitigate the impacts of climate change. A variety of different socio-demographic factors can impact support or opposition to these policies. Beginning to understand what may impact support in various scenarios can help policymakers to be better equipped to garner support for future initiatives. In energy economy states like Oklahoma, the relationship of individuals to the energy industry is of particular interest for understanding support or opposition for climate change-related policies. In addition, there is often a perceived relationship between the oil and gas industry and political leaning. Using the University of Oklahoma Center for Risk and Crisis Management’s (OU CRCM) Oklahoma Meso-Scale Integrated Sociogeographic Network (MSIS-Net) survey data, I ask the question: does renewable energy (RE) ownership, employment in the oil and gas sector, and political ideology support for climate change mitigation policies?

Lessons from the archives: The importance of understanding historical agriculture and change in the Southern Great Plains (Poster)

Georgiana Belem Carrasco GalvanOklahoma State University, Jacqeline Vadjunec, Oklahoma State University, Todd Fagin, Center for Spatial Analysis/Oklahoma Biological Survey, University of Oklahoma, Chloe Taylor, Oklahoma State University

Date/Time: 2/27/2022/2:00-3:20 pm

Session: Research in Rural Geography Poster Session (2:00-3:20 pm)

Keywords: Archive, agriculture, Southern Great Plains, resilience 

Abstract

The history of agriculture in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) reveals stories of adaptation, ingenuity, and grit. New settlers, farmers, and ranchers learned quickly about hard work, extreme weather, strong winds, and the use of promising technologies to harness water from the Ogalla Aquifer. During the 1900s, farmers started to populate the area taking advantage of the Santa Fe Trail and land claims made available through the Homestead Act (1862), etc. This region quickly became known as the “bread basket of the United States.” However, environmental stressors, agricultural practices, and technology use in the Plains contributed to environmental disasters such as the Dust Bowl (i.e. “The Dirty 30s”). We argue that understanding past land use is important to increase the efficacy of current agroecological resilience studies. Using data from the USDA’s Census of Agriculture Historical Archive, along with agricultural policy and technological development histories, we analyze the highly dynamic and shifting land and water uses in a tri-state area of the SGP (Cimarron County, Oklahoma; Union County, New Mexico; and Las Animas County, Colorado) before, during, and after the Dust Bowl. Further, we draw upon 10 years of ethnographic fieldwork in the region to provide social and cultural context. Results illustrate the dynamic and shifting nature of agriculture in the region over the past 100 years. They also highlight the role of technology and agricultural policies in influencing land use practices. Lastly, the results show the importance of understanding past changes when thinking about current land use and future sustainability.

Animals and their use of space 1 (Session)

Claire Burch and Rebecca Loraamm, Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma (Organizer and Chairs)

Date/Time: 2/27/2022/2:00-3:20 pm

Description

In this session, we invite papers examining questions of animal space use towards new ecological, biological, or conservation knowledge. Included are studies dealing with themes such as animal movement, space use as adaptation, habitat selection, home range delineation, migration, territoriality, gene dispersal, group movement dynamics, and site fidelity. Completed and ongoing studies, be they quantitative or qualitative in their methodology, are welcome. In addition to quantitative and qualitative evaluations of animal movement and use of space-oriented around wildlife, we hope to bring human perspective and interactions to this discussion. We are also interested in seeing research that evaluates animal use of space with a human component, including topics such as human perception of animal migration and movement, animal movement and use of space in urban areas and interactions with human space, and other related topics that integrate how humans share space with animals. Past iterations of this session have led to vibrant discussions accompanied by a diverse representation of geographic, ecological, and biological perspectives. Submission of work identifying pattern and/or process in animal space use are preferred, but any topics listed in the session description, or adjacent topics are welcome for submission. We encourage individuals involved in research related to human dimensions of animals and the use of space to submit as well, in an effort to make this session more interdisciplinary in nature.

Presenters

Zijian Wan, University of California

Kristen Gould, University of Kentucky

Tony Stallins, University of Kentucky

Xavier Haro-Carrión, University of Florida

Animals and their use of space 2 (Session)

Claire Burch and Rebecca Loraamm, Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma (Organizer and Chairs)

Date/Time: 2/27/2022/3:40-5:00 pm

Description

In this session, we invite papers examining questions of animal space use towards new ecological, biological or conservation knowledge. Included are studies dealing with themes such as animal movement, space use as adaptation, habitat selection, home range delineation, migration, territoriality, gene dispersal, group movement dynamics, and site fidelity. In addition to quantitative and qualitative evaluations of animal movement and the use of space-oriented around wildlife, we hope to bring human perspective and interactions to this discussion. We are also interested in seeing research that evaluates animal use of space with a human component, including topics such as human perception of animal migration and movement, animal movement and use of space in urban areas and interactions with human space, and other related topics that integrate how humans share space with animals. Submission of work identifying pattern and/or process in animal space use are preferred, but any topics listed in the session description, or adjacent topics are welcome for submission. We encourage individuals involved in research related to human dimensions of animals and the use of space to submit as well, in an effort to make this session more interdisciplinary in nature.

Presenters

Gabrielle Perras St Jean, Institut national de la recherche scientifique

Morgan Rogers, University of California - Los Angeles

Adriana DiSilvestro, University of British Columbia

Julie Coumau, Sorbonne Université

Restoring Néške’emāne - A Film Screening and Panel Discussion (Panel)

Laurel SmithDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma (Organizer and Chair)

Date/Time: 2/27/2022/3:40-5:00 pm

Description

With funding from Kansas State University’s Tribal Technical Assistance to Brownfields program, Restoring Néške’emāne was coproduced by Loren Waters (Cherokee and Kiowa), Laurel C. Smith (University of Oklahoma), and the media professionals of FireThief - a Native owned firm located in Tulsa. This 11-minute film showcases the work of Damon Dunbar, a Tribal environmental professional with the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes who coordinated a community-engaged effort to assess and remediate the environmental health risks found on the campus of a former Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Indian Boarding School in Concho, Oklahoma. Located 30 miles west of the Oklahoma City metro, Concho is also the site of Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes’ government services, as well as some of their businesses. The BIA shut down the Concho Indian School in 1984, just as the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes started exerting a strong influence on its operations.

For more than 20 years, Damon stewarded the collaborative process that led to funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and resulted in the recent demolition of two dormitory buildings built in the 1930s. In the film, Damon and his colleague, Principal Chief Gordon Yellowman, two other dormitories built in the 1960s, which are not only moldering and slotted for demolition but also graced by extraordinary murals painted by Steven Grounds. Damon also introduces his colleague Chieko Buffalo, who is stepping into a leadership role on the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes’ brownfields projects.

During this panel session, Restoring Néške’emāne will be introduced, screened, and discussed along the lines of critical Indigenous geographies, geohumanities, and more.  

Participants

Introduction: Laurel Smith, University of Oklahoma

Panelist: Loren Walters, Freelance filmmaker

Panelist: Deondre Smiles, University of Victoria

Panelist: Angie Sanchez, Michigan State University

Panelist: Matthew Gandy, University of Cambridge

Panelist: Sarah de Leeuw, University of Northern British Columbia

Eastern U.S. Atmospheric River Types and Trends (Poster)

Craig A RamseyerVirginia Tech, Tyler J Stanfield, Virginia Tech, Zachary Van Tol, Arizona State University, Tyler Gingrich, Virginia Tech, Parker Henry, Virginia Tech, Peter Forister, Virginia Tech, Bradley Lamkin, School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Shakira Stackhouse, Virginia Tech, Samrin Samaiya Sauda, Virginia Tech

Date/Time: 2/27/2022/3:40-5:00 pm

Session: All Physical Geography Considered (3:40-5:00 pm)

Keywords: atmospheric rivers, eastern U.S., rainfall

Abstract

Atmospheric rivers (ARs), driven by extratropical cyclogenesis, are the primary moisture transport forcing in the Western U.S. and principal producer of extreme precipitation events. A growing body of evidence suggests similar impacts for the Central and Eastern U.S. This study determines the leading modes of variability, or “types” of ARs in the Central and Eastern U.S. study domain through the implementation of a machine learning methodology. Self-organizing maps (SOMs) are leveraged to determine these ARs types, including an analysis of ARs during all months, and a subsequent analysis focusing on winter ARs. Additionally, trend analyses on the strength and size of ARs are produced to analyze changes to AR-driven integrated moisture transport over the 40-year study period. The SOMs confirm extratropical cyclones as the primary driver of ARs and the SOMs show coastal cyclones and lee-side cyclones as the producer of the strongest ARs. The trend analysis results suggest that mature cyclones, most notably Nor'easters and ARs rooted in the Gulf of Mexico, are transporting increasing amounts of moisture throughout the study period. Increasing moisture transport by mature cyclones across the Central and Eastern U.S. have important implications for flooding in highly populated corridors, including the Northeast U.S. and Mid-South. The results presented here show the types of ARs that drive increased precipitation in these regions. This study provides evidence that topography helps increase precipitation efficiency during certain AR types.

Animals and their use of space 3 (Session)

Claire Burch and Rebecca LoraammDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma (Organizer and Chairs)

Date/Time: 2/27/2022/5:20-6:40 pm

Description

In this session, we invite papers examining questions of animal space use towards new ecological, biological or conservation knowledge. Included are studies dealing with themes such as animal movement, space use as adaptation, habitat selection, home range delineation, migration, territoriality, gene dispersal, group movement dynamics, and site fidelity. In addition to quantitative and qualitative evaluations of animal movement and the use of space-oriented around wildlife, we hope to bring human perspective and interactions to this discussion. We are also interested in seeing research that evaluates animal use of space with a human component, including topics such as human perception of animal migration and movement, animal movement and use of space in urban areas and interactions with human space, and other related topics that integrate how humans share space with animals. Submission of work identifying pattern and/or process in animal space use are preferred, but any topics listed in the session description, or adjacent topics are welcome for submission. We encourage individuals involved in research related to human dimensions of animals and the use of space to submit as well, in an effort to make this session more interdisciplinary in nature.

Presenters

Aidan McLendon, Texas State University - San Marcos

David Havlick, University of Colorado - Colorado Springs

Zach Tabor, University of North Texas

Talya ten Brink, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries

Estraven Lupino-Smith, University of Victoria

Histories of Geography and Spatial Narratives (Session)

Bret WallachDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma (Chair)

Date/Time: 2/27/2022/5:20-6:40 pm

 

Presenters

Meg RolandLinn-Benton Community College

Judith Tyner, California State University, Long Beach

Bret Wallach, University of Oklahoma

The Places Where We Belong (Talk)

Bret WallachDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma

Date/Time: 2/27/2022/5:50 pm

Session: Histories of Geography and Spatial Narratives (5:20-6:40 pm)

Keywords: geography

Abstract

Close to 50 years ago, I got a nice letter from a well-known geographer who, having read something of mine, wrote to say that, like me, his papers had always begun with him falling in love with a place. Sentimental nonsense? Perhaps, but his comment comes to mind as I finish a book-length manuscript (tentatively with the same name as this paper) summarizing what I've learned from a lifetime in this discipline. Not about the discipline or about research or about universities or pedagogy but about what travelling widely has taught me about what we make or should want to make of our lives. In this session I read the manuscript's opening pages, which introduce the theme of the work along with its narrative structure.

Monday, February 28th

The role of shared micromobility in public transportation. Is it complementary or substitutionary? (Poster)

Kwangyul ChoiDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma

Date/Time: 2/28/2022/2:00-3:20 pm

Session: Urban Geography, Regional Planning, and Transportation Geography (2:00-3:20 pm)

Keywords: Shared micromobility; public transportation; transit ridership; urbanized area

Abstract

Shared micromobility ridership has dramatically risen in the past years in the United States. The number of trips on bike share (both station-based and dockless) and scooter share marked 35 million in 2017. During the following two years, the ridership increased by a factor of four (136 million trips in 2019) (NACTO, 2020). As these new mobility options have been widely used, their travel impact has become significant, particularly for urban residents. In terms of its impact on public transportation, it has been expected to increase transit ridership by dealing with the first/last mile problems by complementing the local or regional transit system (Ma et al., 2015; Zhang & Zhang, 2018). However, the existing findings are rather mixed, and some studies suggest that shared micromobility is more likely to substitute the public transit service in the area (Campbell & Brakewood, 2017). Despite these uncertainties, the impact of shared micromobility on public transit ridership has been understudied. To fill this knowledge gap, this study examines the role of shared micromobility in public transit ridership. Focusing on three types of shared micromobility (i.e., pedaled bikes, e-bikes, and e-scooters), this study quantifies the changes in transit ridership per capita at the urbanized area level before and after the adoption of shared micromobility while controlling other likely drivers of transit ridership change, such as transit service coverage and demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the areas as well as the built environment.

Tuesday, March 1st

Assessing the Impacts of a Weather Decision Support System for Oklahoma Public Safety Officials (Talk)

Dolly Y. Na-YemehDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma, Christopher A Fiebrich, Oklahoma Mesonet/Oklahoma Climatological Survey, University of Oklahoma, James E Hocker, Oklahoma Mesonet/Oklahoma Climatological Survey, University of Oklahoma, Mark A Shafer, Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma

Date/Time: 3/1/2022/8:15 am

Session: Risk Perception (8:00-9:20 am)

Keywords: Oklahoma Mesonet, Weather Decision Support, Emergency Management, Oklahoma, Google Analytics, Public Safety Officials, cost savings

Abstract

Oklahoma's First-response Information Resource System using Telecommunications (OK-First) has been used for many years to provide education, training, connections, and follow-up support for public safety officials in Oklahoma. Public safety officials use OK-First training and Mesonet tools to plan and make decisions to save lives and property. However, like most public systems, little is known about user interactions with tools, decisions made, and estimated savings using a weather decision support system. This study used a mixed approach of instruments and methods to collect and analyze data from three key sources to assess the perceptions, beneficiaries, and applications of weather support systems for public safety officials. Results showed that a diverse set of tools were needed and used by public safety officials to make life-saving decisions in hazardous weather conditions. OK-First tools resulted in estimated self-reported cost savings of over $1.2 M for 12 months. This study provides a crucial step in determining user interactions with tools, training, and services to better understand weather decision support systems used during hazardous weather.

Deconstructing 'smart' Delhi: Critically examining the production of knowledge and difference in New Delhi's smart city project (Talk)

Aditi SinghDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma

Date/Time: 3/1/2022/8:30 am

Session: Role of GIS in planning smart and resilient cities I (8:00-9:20 am)

Keywords: Smart city, knowledge production, access, sustainability, global South

Abstract

In 2014, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced 100 smart cities under the federal/central government’s initiative of Smart Cities Mission (SCM) programme, an initiative effective along with the regime change in the central government of India. The goal of this programme was to improve the urban infrastructural crisis. The Ministry of Urban Development (MoUD), a central government body, collaborated with Bloomberg Philanthropies to design and develop the Smart City Challenge, a method through which Indian cities competed with each other for the central government’s funding. One of the central and crucial criteria for the selection of cities under the Challenge was a citizen-centric approach – an inclusive and sustainable smart city. New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC), undertaking the smart city project in New Delhi, has not announced any direct initiatives specifically for the differently situated urban populations in the city such as economically weaker sections (EWS)/slum dwellers and women within its smart city proposal (SCP). In addition, the identity of these ‘smart’ stakeholders remains ambiguous along with ambiguous receivers of sustainable environmental goals. This dissertation will address these gaps by deploying methods of discourse analysis, semi-structured interviews, and survey questionnaires to study NDMC’s smart city project. The results of this study will argue for access to the smart city for whom, sustainability for whom, and who are the citizens participating in the planning and implementation of the smart city projects.

Human Mobility to Parks under the COVID-19 Pandemic and Wildfire Seasons in the Western and Central United States (Talk)

Anni YangDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma, Jue Yang, University of Georgia, Di Yang, University of Wyoming, Rongting Xu, Oregon State University, Yaqian He, University of Central Arkansas, Amanda Aragon, University of Georgia, Han Qiu, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Wenwen Cheng, College of Architecture, University of Oklahoma, Changjie Cai, Health Sciences Center, University of Oklahoma

Date/Time: 3/1/2022/8:30 am

Session: HRD Emergent Papers: Wildfire (8:00-9:20 am)

Keywords: COVID-19, pandemic, park visitation, human mobility, wildfire

Abstract

In 2020, people's health suffered a great crisis under the dual effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the extensive, severe wildfires in the western and central United States. Parks, including city, national, and cultural parks, offer a unique opportunity for people to maintain their recreation behaviors following the social distancing protocols during the pandemic. However, massive forest wildfires in western and central US, producing harmful toxic gases and smoke, pose significant threats to human health and affect their recreation behaviors and mobility to parks. In this study, we employed the Geographically and Temporally Weighted Regression (GTWR) Models to investigate how COVID-19 and wildfires jointly shaped human mobility to parks, regarding the number of visits per capita, dwell time, and travel distance to parks, during June - September 2020. We detected strong correlations between visitations and COVID-19 incidence in southern Montana, western Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah before August. However, the pattern was weakened over time, indicating the decreasing trend of the degree of concern regarding the pandemic. Moreover, more park visits and lower dwell time were found in parks further away from wildfires and less air pollution in Washington, Oregon, California, Colorado, and New Mexico, during the wildfire season, suggesting the potential avoidance of wildfires when visiting parks. This study provides important insights on people’s responses in recreation and social behaviors when facing multiple severe crises that impact their health and wellbeing, which could support the preparation and mitigation of the health impacts from future pandemics and natural hazards.

Representing Transborder Communities: Yolanda Cruz and Reencuentros (Talk)

Laurel C. SmithDepartment of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma, Filoteo Gómez Martínez, University of Alabama - Huntsville

Date/Time: 3/1/2022/10:25 am

Session: Film Geography (9:40-11:00 am)

Keywords: film geographies, Indigenous geographies, critical geopolitics, Mexico, migration

Abstract

Yolanda Cruz is a Chatina filmmaker from the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca who earned her MFA from the world-renowned film school at UCLA. Her film Reencuentros: 2501 migrantes was released in 2009 (and its title translated into English as 2,501 Migrants: A Journey). This feature-length film documents the making and moving of Alejandro Santiago’s 2,501 ceramic sculptures, each of which represents an emigrant from the Zapotec community that Santiago considers his hometown. Between Santiago’s haunting yet heroic sculptures and Cruz’s visual storytelling skills, Reencuentros vividly illustrates the distinct geographies of transborder communities associated with Indigenous regions of Oaxaca at the start of the 21st century.

Our paper narrates a reader-centered story about Reencuentros that strives to reach beyond an interpretation from the nowhere land of images and ideas (only). To begin, we connect film geographies with critical geopolitics and create a frame for seeing the affective logic of (some) documentary films. We also introduce the concept of decolonial affect, which we find especially useful for explaining our love for Indigenous films emerging out of places like Oaxaca. After briefly summarizing Yolanda’s career as a transnational Chatina filmmaker, we offer an abridged interpretation of Reencuentros’ re-member-ing force. Our key task in this paper is to highlight this film’s affective logic. To do this we detail what Yolanda’s film moved us – and others – to do in Oklahoma. We then note how friction can limit such impetus and conclude with the hope that our story might incite impulsion anew.