Skip Navigation

OU Microbiologists Elected as Fellows in the American Academy of Microbiology

OU Public Affairs WebsiteOU homepagePublic Affairs homepage
Skip Side Navigation

OU Microbiologists Elected as Fellows in the American Academy of Microbiology

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Jana Smith, Director, Strategic Communications for R&D, University of Oklahoma, (405) 325-1322, jana.smith@ou.edu

NORMAN — Two University of Oklahoma microbiology professors are among a national group of 87 newly elected fellows in the American Academy of Microbiology. Rodney K. Tweten, OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, and Tyrell Conway, OU Norman Campus, were elected through a highly-selective, peer-review process, based on their records of scientific achievement and original contributions that have advanced microbiology.

Tweten, George Lynn Cross Research Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology in the OU College of Medicine, is nationally and internationally noted as a pioneer in research of bacterial toxins, the cholestral-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), a major contributor to the pathogenesis of diseases, such as streptococcus pneumonia, staphylococcus and listeria. These diseases are especially virulent in children causing nearly a million childhood deaths annually worldwide.

Tweten is recognized as the first researcher to describe the three-dimensional crystal structure of CDCs and his research has translated to practical applications, such as the production of a vaccine candidate for S. pneumonia, which is planned to enter phase one clinical trials.  Consistently funded for more than 26 years, Tweten’s research is currently supported by three grants from NIH/NIAID and PATH Vaccine Solutions (Gate’s Foundation). The success of his laboratory has led to one patent and two patent applications pending.

Conway, Henry Zarrow Presidential Professor of Microbiology in the Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Arts and Sciences, serves as co-director of OU’s Advanced Center for Genome Technology.  Conway’s research is focused on understanding how bacterial cells work, from genome to transcriptome to metabolome, their genetic circuitry and metabolic networks, the physiology of the colonized E. coli cell, how it controls its growth and competes for nutrients in the gut microbial community.

Conway’s group published the first E.coli microarray experiment in 1999 and now is focused on computational aspects of high-throughput gene expression data. The research group is also exploring and characterizing the symbiotic relationship in which E. coli scavenges oxygen to generate anaerobic conditions in the intestine, which stimulates growth of anaerobes that degrade complex polysaccharides in turn releasing simple sugars that cross-feed E. coli.

The American Academy of Microbiology is the honorific leadership group of the American Society for Microbiology. The mission of the Academy is to recognize scientific excellence, as well as foster knowledge and understanding in the microbiological sciences. More information on the Academy can be found at http://academy.asm.org.

Recent News

OU Student Receives Udall Scholarship

Daniel Hayden

NORMAN - University of Oklahoma honors student Daniel R. Hayden has been named a 2018 Udall Scholar. The Udall Foundation Scholarship recognizes undergraduate students who demonstrate a commitment to careers related to the environment or to Native American public policy or health care. Hayden is one of 50 nationwide selected for the honor. Read more

OU Professor to Receive IEEE Satellite Communications Technical Contribution Award

Mohammed Atiquzzaman

Mohammed Atiquzzaman, is the recipient of the prestigious Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Satellite Communications Technical Contribution Award for 2018. The annual award is given to an accomplished, senior-level researcher who has achieved outstanding results in satellite communications and recognizes excellent scientific contributions done by academia and industries. Atiquzzaman will receive the award at the IEEE International Conference on Communications in Kansas City, Missouri, May 20-24. Read more

OU Physicist Developing Quantum-Enhanced Sensors for Real-Life Applications

Albert Marino

A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. In a new study, Marino’s team, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, demonstrates the ability of quantum states of light to enhance the sensitivities of state-of-the-art plasmonic sensors. The team presents the first implementation of a sensor with sensitivities considered state-of-the-art and shows how quantum-enhanced sensing can find its way into real-life applications. Read more

OU Class of 2018 Gift to Honor Borens

The Boren Green

NORMAN – The University of Oklahoma Class of 2018 will celebrate their time at OU through a dedicated green space that will add to OU’s national reputation as one of America’s most beautiful campuses. Located along Lindsey Street in front of the newly completed Residential Colleges, this year’s class gift will fund a picturesque lawn named The Boren Green. Read more

OU Students Receive National Security Education Program Award for International Study

The Boren Awards

NORMAN – University of Oklahoma senior James Ratcliff and OU junior Libby Trowbridge recently were selected as recipients of the prestigious Boren Award for International Study, sponsored by the National Security Education Program. Thirty-four OU students have received the award since the program began in 1994. Read more

OU-Led Research Team Accelerating Antibiotic Discovery

Zygurskaya and Rybenkov

NORMAN — University of Oklahoma professors, Helen Zgurskaya and Valentin Rybenkov, and team are addressing the challenge and critical need for new antibiotics that can fight infections caused by the multi-drug resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, considered an urgent threat by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The OU team responded to a special request for applications from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, and received a five-year, $5.7 million grant to develop new, more effective approaches against Gram-negative bacteria that are protected by multi-drug efflux pumps and low-permeability membranes. Read more

News Archives

2017  | 2016  | 2015  | 2014  |  2013  

May 2018

April 2018

March 2018


For requests for past releases, please contact OU Public Affairs at (405) 325-1701 or publicaffairs@ou.edu.