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“To provide the best possible educational experience for our students.”

Faculty Fellows

Working on a Building: Designing for Diversity and Inclusion

The very point of diversity and inclusion in higher education is to ensure that learning is collegial and collaborative for all members of the university community and that no group finds their voices marginalized because of race, gender, or class biases. Building a healthy institution requires the participation of all its stakeholders, but too often we talk only with those who share our own outlooks, visiting amongst “ourselves” but excluding others, however unintentionally.

This series, while geared at faculty, looks to offer instructional and institutional resources by facilitating communication outside of our all-too-often narrow cadres. Diverse and inclusive education requires students who learn appropriate protocols and cultural standards of interaction from faculty who bring cultural competence to their course designs and delivery; to avail themselves of these tools, faculty must have support from administrative support structures; and administrators need input from university communities—students, faculty, and staff—to shape responsive and relevant policy.

This thematic series will offer workshops, talks by local and guest experts, and reading groups that will aim at the development of projects that faculty can immediately put to use in three core areas: 1) articulating the broad educational values that come from diversity and inclusion in pedagogy; 2) identifying and sharing best practices for ensuring student success; and 3) attending to institutional structural urgencies. Like architects, engineers, and crews working on a building, faculty, administrators, and students designing for diversity and inclusion will work best when we work together.

 

ryan_bisel

Joshua B. Nelson
Interim Director of Film & Media Studies
Associate Professor of English

Dr. Joshua B. Nelson, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation and a native Oklahoman, is Interim Director of Film & Media Studies, Associate Professor of English, and an affiliated faculty member with Native American Studies, focusing on American Indian literature and film. His book, Progressive Traditions: Identity in Cherokee Literature and Culture, looks to dismantle the pervasive assimilated/traditional dichotomy plaguing American Indian literary criticism. It explores the empowering potential of traditional, adaptive strategies and practices to address cultural and historical dilemmas.

 

Faculty Fellow Reading Circle: For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood … and the Rest of Y’all Too

Starting October 7th, 2016

As part of the 2016-17 Center for Teaching Excellence faculty fellowship focused on themes of diversity and inclusion, Joshua Nelson will lead a fall reading group to spark our thinking about unexamined expectations we might bring to the classroom and concrete strategies we might use to reach students who feel apart from the traditional university. We’ll discuss Christopher Emdin’s recent and provocative For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood … and the Rest of Y’all Too, in which he argues for a broad sense of “the hood,” and a “neoindigenous” realignment for urban education, as he proposes several innovative and effective ways of teaching students too often thought “unteachable.” CTE will make copies of the book available to participants. We’ll first gather on October 7 when we’ll arrange future meetings.

Date  Time  Location
Friday, October 2812:00 PM - 1:15 PMOld Science Hall, FMS conference room
Friday, November 1812:00 PM - 1:15 PMOld Science Hall, FMS conference room
Friday, December 912:00 PM - 1:15 PMThe Memorial Union, David Schrage Traditions Room (near the center of the second floor)

Presidential Research Professor of Philosophy and Women’s and Gender Studies Sherri Irvin is teaching a course in which students are investigating barriers to educational access among their campus peers. Towards the end of the course, the diversity and inclusion fellowship will help fund a banquet at which students will communicate their findings to faculty. The course meets during the spring semester, so the dinner will be toward late April. We expect approximately ten faculty to attend and hear from the enrolled undergraduate researchers.

In February, Mary Yu Danico, Professor of Sociology and Director of the Asian American Transnational Research Initiative at California State Polytechnic University, will visit campus to discuss implementing High-Impact Practices (HIPs) in higher education curricula. Research indicates that HIPs improve student success and retention generally but are especially effective for underrepresented minority students. Dr. Danico will discuss what HIPs are and effective programs that have adapted existing strategies for greater impact and student success.

In late February or March, Assistant Professor of Native American Studies Heather Shotton will conduct a workshop on Native American students in higher education, focused on historical contexts, Indigenous approaches to teaching, and effective pedagogical strategies for engaging Native students. Developing cultural competence to work with American Indian students, one of the highest minority populations at OU, but far less commonly encountered in other places, will be a primary goal of this workshop.

 


Looking Ahead!: What will students be like in 5 years! How is higher education set to change?

This faculty learning series will focus on what we can expect from students in the next five years.  This would be tied to new employment and technology focuses in common education, which is meant to make students successful and employable and how they will be bringing these experiences and soft skills to higher education.  We will also focus on the new emphases on creativity, entrepreneurship, and problem solving and the skills that students may be bringing to your courses in the near future.

It will focus on a few key areas:

  • How will students use technology and learn differently than they do today?
  • What federal initiatives and programs are being instituted in how students are using technology and being prepared for college?
  • How is higher education changing as to these needs and requirements?  
  • How are student expectations of higher education changing?

 

Theresa Cullen

Theresa A. Cullen
Associate Professor of Instructional Psychology and Technology

Dr Theresa Cullen is an associate professor in the Instructional Psychology and Technology program in the Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education. She coordinates the 1 to 1 iPad program for which the college earned the Apple Distinguished Program award in 2013 and 2015.  In 2015 she was named an Apple Distinguished Educator and networks with educators at all levels about innovative uses of technology in teaching and learning.   She is the coordinator of the new Online 21st Century Master’s program. This cohort based program starts each January and is delivered fully online using Janux. 

 

Spring 2017 Events  

Tap Into YOUR Creative Mind

Tues, October 24, 2017 7:15 PM – 8:15 PM

We are all creative, some artists, musical, and almost everyone even those who can barely get out a stick figure are visual learners. Come learn about how visual learners can be supported through creative projects, especially sketchnoting. Learn the creative end, the research, and most of all come ready to have fun! Register Here

Design Thinking Workshop

Wed, January 25, 2017 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM

When we think about the future of education in the next 5 years, we must consider is our own paradigm shifts in how we plan for and view students. Join us for a short workshop on design based thinking and begin to think about how you can better design learning experiences for your students.
Whether we realize it or not, we as educators are designers, and busy ones at that. Everyday we face the challenges of how to construct and assemble learning experiences for our students. Our attempts in drafting meaningful learning are routinely confronted by real, enigmatic, and sometimes unexpected challenges.

While our tools have adapted, and curriculum as well, our professional practice requires a shift in perspective and approach that can foster and support deeper and more fulfilling learning experiences for our students.

In this workshop participants will learn the fundamentals of design thinking to better meet student needs and allow for more rich learning to occur in an academic setting. Attendees of this workshop will gain new skills and confidence to rework, reconfigure, and redesign learning in their classrooms that promote empathy, ideation, and the understanding that like the world around us, our classroom learning must be ever evolving.

What to Bring:
Please bring an activity from your class that you might want to redesign. This is a wonderful opportunity to bring a graduate student or co-instructor with you to collaborate with you on this workshop.

Register Here

About the Speaker:
Rabbi Michael Cohen is a consultant, featured speaker, workshop facilitator, and writer in the areas of Technology Integration and Curriculum Design. He works with schools and programs nationally to help them discover how they can redefine learning experiences by harnessing the power of technology.

He is an Apple Distinguished Educator and a former Director of Educational Technology where he led his school in becoming an Apple Distinguished School. He is Rabbinically Ordained, and holds a Masters of Science in Education. He speaks regularly at national and regional conferences such as ISTE, SXSWEdu, and Apple Education Events. In 2016 he was ranked as one of the Top 50 EdTech Influencers in education.

 

Archive

Looking Ahead!: What will students be like in 5 years! How is higher education set to change?

This faculty learning series will focus on what we can expect from students in the next five years.  This would be tied to new employment and technology focuses in common education, which is meant to make students successful and employable and how they will be bringing these experiences and soft skills to higher education.  We will also focus on the new emphases on creativity, entrepreneurship, and problem solving and the skills that students may be bringing to your courses in the near future.

Overview of the Program
What will students look like in 5 years
Mon, September 26, 2016
12:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Bizzell Library Lower Level 1, Rm. 121

Most Likely to Succeed Book Club - Mondays
Mon, October 10,17, 24, and 31
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Bizzell Library Lower Level 1, Rm. 121


 

Supporting Innovation in a Mobile Device World the Possibility of App Development In Xcode
How does computer science and creating apps look like in the workplace.  Our speaker from Apple Education will spend an hour talking about communication, collaboration and critical thinking related to using XCode as a teaching skill.

Tuesday, November 1, 2016 | 6:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Three Partners Place


 

Writing Apps Using XCode An Introduction and Resource Sharing

In this session our representative from Apple Education will be reviewing the free curriculum Everyone Can Code for writing Apps in XCode. We will be providing laptops with Xcode installed and all participants will leave with a small simple app they  have created to see how the curriculum could be used to learn more.

Wednesday, November 2, 2016
7:15 PM – 9:30 PM
Room 334, Collings Hall


 

Everyone Can Code Initiative
What kind of knowledge can you expect students to have about computer programming and coding when they enter the University. We will discuss some of the coding initiatives that many of our future students will have had introductory or significant exposure to computer program when they arrive at OU. This big picture look will look at initiatives by Code.org, Botball, and Apple seeking to address the computational thinking skills gap that currently exists in our students.

Wednesday, November 2, 2016 | 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Community Room PHCLC

Faculty Fellow Archive