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Students & Alumni

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Students & Alumni

Our best resource is our people! The CASS team is made up of both engineers and scientists from a wide variety of disciplines who work together to design custom sampling solutions to better study and understand the world around us.  

gustavo deAzevedo

Gustavo (Gus) Britto Hupsel de Azevedo

Graduate Student, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Research Nuclei: Atmospheric Chemistry, Solution-Based Engineering
Hometown: Rio de Janerio, Brazil

Email: gust@ou.edu 

Gus' main research focus is on integrating sensors and designing sampling systems for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) to collect observations in the lower atmosphere. As an Electrical and Computer Engineer (ECE) in the CASS engineering corps, his duties are UAS electronics, sensor integration, UAS autopilot software development, and post-processing software development. Besides the UAS work, Gus also supports other instrumentation initiatives at CASS. During his master’s studies in ECE, Gus developed the Lower Atmosphere Carbon Dioxide Acquisition System (LACAS), a low-cost, in-situ, spatiotemporally resolved sampling system capable of retrieving carbon dioxide concentrations from the ground to 5000 ft. In his Ph.D. research, Gus is studying how low-power electronics and smart flight pattern algorithms can be optimized to improve flight endurance with fixed-wing UAS.

In his spare time, Gus enjoys kiteboarding in the Oklahoma lakes, fpv mini-quadcopter racing, and building RC gliders. Gus is also an avid Oklahoma City Dodgers (baseball) fan.

Education

  • 2019 M.S. Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma
  • 2017 B.S. Computer Engineering, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janerio
  • 2010 M.S. Business Administration and Management, Institutio Brasileiro de Mercados e Capitais
  • 2007 B.S. Business Information Systems, Institutio Brasileiro de Mercados e Capitais

Links


tyler bell

Tyler Bell

Graduate Student, School of Meteorology
Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies
(CIMMS)
Research Nuclei: Boundary Layer Structure and Dynamics, Data Processing
Hometown: Bartlesville, OK

Email: tyler.bell@ou.edu
Twitter: @TMBell5

Tyler’s research focuses on the use of both ground-based remote sensing and WxUAS to observe the atmospheric boundary layer. Specifically, Tyler is interested in finding novel methods to combine remote and in-situ measurement techniques to gain a better understanding of various atmospheric boundary layer phenomena. He is currently a research associate in CIMMS working to evaluate retrieval methods for ground-based radiometers deployed in CLAMPS and helping provide recommendations for a ground based profiling network.

Outside of work and school, Tyler enjoys playing soccer, mountain biking, attending OU football games, and woodworking. He also has way too many cookbooks and loves to get into the kitchen to try new things.

Education

  • 2018 M.S. Meteorology, University of Oklahoma
  • 2016 B.S. Meteorology, University of Oklahoma

Links


austin dixon

Austin Dixon

Graduate Student, School of Meteorology
Research Nucleus: Boundary Layer Structure and Dynamics
Hometown: Sand Springs, OK

Email: awdixon@ou.edu
Twitter: @AustinDixonWx

Austin’s research focuses on using high resolution simulations of severe thunderstorms to guide field observations of these storms using WxUAS. Historically, field observations in meteorology have largely driven model development. The advancement in computing technology has allowed us to model thunderstorms at ultra-high resolution, resolving features not previously visible in simulations. Some of these features have been observed to intensify their parent thunderstorms in the simulation, leading to various forms of severe weather such as tornadoes. However, they have yet to be identified in real thunderstorms. This provides a unique opportunity to harness sUAS technology in an effort to observe these features in the field. Ultimately, if these features are identifiable, it could lead to improved forecasts and warnings of severe thunderstorms.

In his free time, Austin enjoys most anything that gets him outside such as hunting, fishing, archery, golfing, snowboarding, cycling, and storm chasing. He is also an avid motocross racer and enjoys playing his guitar.

Education

  • 2019 M.S. Atmospheric Science, University of Wisconsin - Madison
  • 2017 B.S. Meteorology, University of Oklahoma

francesca lappin

Francesca Lappin

Graduate Student, School of Meteorology
Research Nucleus: Boundary Layer Structure and Dynamics
Hometown: Wellington, FL

Email: francesca.lappin@ou.edu

Francesca’s research focuses on utilizing vertical profiles and horizontal transects collected with uncrewed aircraft systems to understand convective initiation (CI).  She is also interested in examining how heterogeneities in land-use can impact CI through strong, sharp gradients of temperature, moisture, and surface drag.

Outside of her studies, Francesca enjoys cooking, playing with her cat, Cheezit, and being outdoors.

Education

  •  2019 B.S. Meteorology, Florida State University

Awards and Recognition

  • American Meteorological Society Senior Scholar (2018)

brian greene

Brian Greene

Graduate Student, School of Meteorology
Research Nuclei: Boundary Layer Structure and Dynamics, Data Processing
Hometown: Arlington Heights, IL

Email: brian.greene@ou.edu
Twitter: @wxbrain

Brian’s research focuses on developing and utilizing uncrewed aircraft systems (UAS) to collect observations in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). This application includes instrumentation, electronics, flight mechanics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and signal processing. He spent most of his master’s research examining how thermodynamic sensor integration can affect the quality of measurements taken, which has led to the creation of a robust rotary-wing UAS by the CASS engineering corps. His Ph.D. research has shifted focus to applying this new in-situ sampling technology to examine the PBL in detail. He is doing so by synthesizing UAS observations with ground-based systems such as instrumented towers and Doppler wind lidars. Furthermore, he is incorporating large eddy simulations (LES) to further explore the lower atmosphere in greater detail by evaluating how simulated thermodynamic and kinematic fields compare to those observed in the real world.

In addition to academia, Brian also enjoys cooking, traveling, hiking, camping, watching clouds, Chicago Cubs baseball, and coffee. He plays the trumpet and was in marching band for 8 years through high school and college. He and his partner Elisa have a chocolate lab named Celsius, who is (somewhat ironically) scared of thunderstorms.

Education

  • 2018 M.S. Meteorology, University of Oklahoma
  • 2016 B.S. Atmospheric Sciences and Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Awards and Recognition

  • Advanced Radar Research Center Student Journal Paper Award (2018 and 2019)
  • Weathernews Inc. Endowed Scholarship (2018)
  • International Symposium on Earth-Science Challenges Invited Speaker (2017)
  • University of Illinois Department of Atmospheric Sciences Ogura Award for Undergraduate Research in Atmospheric Sciences (2016)
  • American Meteorological Society's 96th Annual Meeting First Place: Best Undergraduate Student Poster (2016)
  • University of Illinois Department of Physics Outstanding Teaching Assistant (2015)
  • NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholar (2014 – 2016)
  • Eagle Scout, Boy Scouts of America (2011)

Links


antonio segales

Antonio (Tony) Segales

Graduate Student, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Research Nucleus: Boundary Layer Structure and Dynamics
Hometown: Ascuncion, Paraguay

Email: tony.segales@ou.edu

Tony’s research centers around developing small unmanned aircraft systems for adaptive atmospheric sampling which utilizes CAD modeling, systems optimization, hardware and software integration, and control theory. He has led the design of the CopterSonde series of vehicles, which focus on the collection of precise weather data at high temporal and spatial resolutions. He also advises other projects in which sensor integration or new UAS are required.

When not in the Lab, Tony spends his time flying his own RC helicopter and FPV drones at the airfield. He also enjoys playing tennis, watching Formula 1 races, and enjoying outdoor activities.

Education

  • 2019 M.S. Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma
  • 2016 B.S. Mechatronics, National University of Asuncion

Awards and Recognition

  • American Meteorological Society Outstanding Student Oral Presentation (2018)

Links

jessica blunt

Jessica Blunt

Research Nucleus: Data Processing and Visualization

M.S. Education (December 2021)

2019 B.S. Meteorology with minors in Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Oklahoma

bryan boone

Bryan Boone

Research Nucleus: Solution-Based Engineering

M.S. Mechanical Engineering (August 2020)

2019 B.S. Mechanical Engineering with minors in Mathematics and Physics, University of Oklahoma

lindsey deluga

Lindsey Deluga

Research Nucleus: Atmospheric Chemistry

B.S. Meteorology with a minor in Mathematics (May 2021)

 

ariel jacobs

Ariel Jacobs

Research Nucleus: Data Processing and Visualization

B.S. Meteorology with minors in Mathematics and Computer Science (May 2021)

 

austin perroux

Austin Perroux

Research Nucleus: Atmospheric Chemistry

B.S. Meteorology with minors in Mathematics and Geographic Information Systems (May 2020)

steven trellis

Steven Trellis

Research Nucleus: Solution-Based Engineering

B.S. Aerospace Engineering with a minor in Electrical and Computer Engineering (May 2021)

matthew whitehead

Matt Whitehead

Research Nuclei: Earth Science and Solution-Based Engineering

B.S. Electrical and Computer Engineering with a minor in Computer Science (December 2020)

Students that worked for CASS faculty, staff, and affiliates as UGRAs and GRAs have gone on to a variety careers in the private and public sector or are pursuing graduate degrees. We are so very proud of them. Here’s where some of our alumni have wound up!

  • Sam Baschky (B.S. Meteorology, May 2019): Pursuing an MBA at the University of Tulsa
  • Luke Black (B.S. Electrical and Computer Engineering, May 2019): L3Harris Technologies
  • Tim Bonin (MS and Ph.D. Meteorology, August 2011): MIT Lincoln Labs
  • Katherine Ho (B.S. Geography, May 2019): Pursuing a master’s at the University of Oklahoma
  • Christopher Hughes (B.S. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, December 2019): Lockheed Martin
  • Sai Kanneganti (M.S. Data Science, 2018): Pursuing a Ph.D. at the University of Oklahoma
  • Jordan Logue (M.S. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, December 2019): NASA 
  • Santiago Mazuera (B.S. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, May 2019): Boeing
  • Scott McThompson (B.S. Geography, May 2019): Pursuing a master’s in Geography at the University of Oklahoma
  • Myleigh Neill (B.S Meteorology, May 2017): North Carolina Climate Office
  • Martha Nyguen (B.S. Electrical and Computer Engineering, May 2019): General Motors Financial
  • Morgan Schnieder (B.S. Meteorology, May 2019): Pursuing a master’s in Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma
  • Daniel Tripp (M.S. Meteorology,  December 2019): NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory
  • Brett Zielke (M.S. Meteorology, December 2011): Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality Air Quality Division